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Game of the Month: Little Nightmares II

Horror and excitement at its best

Text:
Daniel Haaf

Published:
1 March 2021

This article is written by PriceSpy's editorial staff. No one else has influenced the content of it. There are no paid links or other types of advertising collaborations. 

Bring out the comfiest pillow you’ve got and wrap yourself in a blanket- it’s finally time to play the successor to the popular horror adventure game- Little Nightmares. 

Just like in the first game, we’ll get to know the little girl Six, and follow her adventure through a dystopian world whose inhabitants are less than nice.

In the first game, the goal was to guide Six through The Maw to find a way out. With Little Nightmares II, Six has taken a small step back and is instead lending a helping hand to a new main character, the boy Mono.

"With Little Nightmares , we want to create a world and characters that players can care
about - no matter how uncomfortable that might be; and give them something that will creep under their skin and stick in their mind long after the game is over”.

Dave Mervik, Tarsier Studios

Together, Mono and Six must make their way to The Signal Tower to face the dark secrets there. It's a place that has corrupted the world and its inhabitants via a TV signal, and this is where they have to tackle the game's protagonist The Thin Man.

In Little Nightmares II, you control Mono and Six through a world in decay. Avoid the few residents who are there at all costs, solve puzzles and work together to reach the ultimate goal. And maybe together you can prevent Six from facing the terrible fate she faces.

Important facts about Little Nightmares II

  • Game type: Horror adventure game
  • Playing time: 5-6 hours
  • Download size: Approx. 70 GB
  • System: PC, Xbox, Playstation, Switch
  • Editions: Basic edition, TV Edition
  • Gaming world: Linear
  • Launch date: 11 February 2021
We’re not sure these ones want to give us a helping hand.

This is what we think about Little Nightmares II

Little Nightmares II is visually striking with its detailed, dystopian environments and muted colour palette. There is always something to stop and look at, and Tarsier Studios has succeeded well in creating a sense of decay. Both with beautiful graphics and a good sound system that helps set the mood.

Just like in the first game, Little Nightmares II has memorable characters. The residents of Pale City are not something you want to encounter and they are as terrifying as we had hoped. The variety is great and several of the enemies that chase our protagonists give us cold shivers down the spine.

The puzzles we encountered weren’t particularly difficult to solve. The controls and the camera's placement, on the other hand, is a nut that we did not really manage to crack. Some parts of the game became unnecessarily complicated when we had to go by feeling and were spoiled by clumsy controls.

There are some sections in the game that require you to operate Mono with millimetre precision so as not to die. And it’s clumsy controls that caused us to die most of the time.

A constant feeling of never being safe

A well-made detail in Little Nightmares II is that the game's antagonists like to stay in the background and build up the mood. There is a constant feeling of not being safe, even when we are in a place where one shouldn’t be attacked, and it contributes to the fear level being at its peak at all times.

On the whole, we like Little Nightmares II and it’s definitely worth its price for the approximately 5-6 hours it takes to complete the story.

One tip is to play the first Little Nightmares before embarking on the second game. It gives you a good introduction to Six and to be completely honest, the first game actually feels a bit sharper.

"There are many things we’re excited about with this game, and to say too much would be to spoil it. However, while it’s no secret that Little Nightmares II takes place outside The Maw this time, we can’t wait for players to find out what the outside world has in store for Mono and Six"– Dave Mervik, Tarsier Studios

Optimised for Xbox Series X and Playstation 5 in 2021

Little Nightmares II will initially be released for Xbox One and Playstation 4, while the update that will allow the game to take advantage of the benefits that Xbox Series X / S and Playstation 5 have to offer comes later this year. Exactly what benefits will come has not yet been revealed.

Escape or fight

For the first time in the Little Nightmares series, you can finally hit back at all the scary inhabitants of the world. Together with Six, Mono can be more offensive and use weapons to resist the creatures that live in Pale City. Collaborate, find weapons and use traps to increase your chances of survival.

Play the first Little Nightmare before the second

The Little Nightmares II story is linked to the first game; whilst you can certainly jump straight into the second game first without compromising the gaming experience, it is still recommended that you start with Little Nightmares, because Six is ​​the main character in that game.

The tracks have gained greater depth

In Little Nightmares II, many of the tracks have been given a greater depth so that Mono and Six can move more sideways. It gives an extra dimension to the game and you as a player get more to explore. But be careful, if you jump out of sight there is a high risk that you’ll find a hole sending Mono towards certain death.

Computer requirements (minimum)

  • Operative system: Windows 10 (64-Bit)
  • Processor: Intel Core i5-2300 | AMD FX-4350
  • Storage: 4 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Nvidia GeForce GTX 570, 1 GB | AMD Radeon HD 7850, 2 GB
  • DirectX: Version 11

Computer requirements (recommended)

  • Operative system: Windows 10
  • Processor: Intel Core i7-3770 | AMD FX-8350
  • Storage: 4 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Nvidia GeForce GTX 760, 2 GB | AMD Radeon HD 7870, 2 GB
  • DirectX: Version 11

This article is written by PriceSpy's editorial staff. No one else has influenced the content of it. There are no paid links or other types of advertising collaborations. Daniel Haaf can be reached at [email protected]